Good Vibrations

Listen to Music
 
Art is music and music is art - they go hand-in-hand, stimulating the mind, soothing the soul, triggering emotions, giving us happiness, sadness, sorrow and more.
We hope you are enjoying the beautiful works of art and photographs we have for you and we appreciate the support you are giving our artists. We're trying very hard to go beyond your "average, run-of-the-mill" online store, so Welcome to Good Vibrations!
 
Sit down, take a break and have a listen. Here, you will find some of the music that stimulates, inspires and motivates us.

 
Afro Celt Sound System

Afro Celt Sound System - what a cool name! Over the years, this group of eclectic musicians has been developing a unique sound and writing joyful, energetic, uplifting music. They have collaborated with the likes of Peter Gabriel, Robert Plant and Sinéad O'Connor.

A direct contrast to the positive messages in their music, currently the Afro Celt Sound System is buried in controversy, with the band splitting up into two separate groups, both with the same name, thus confusing concert goers worldwide. Too bad!

 

 
Release
 
Afro Celt Sound System
 
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Available on iTunes
 
Ahmad Jamal

Trained in both traditional jazz ("American classical music", as he prefers to call it) and European classical style, Ahmad Jamal has been praised as one of the greatest jazz innovators over his exceptionally long career. Following bebop greats like Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie, Jamal entered the world of jazz at a time when speed and virtuosic improvisation were central to the success of jazz musicians as artists. Jamal, however, took steps in the direction of a new movement, later coined "cool jazz" – an effort to move jazz in the direction of popular music. He emphasized space and time in his musical compositions and interpretations instead of focusing on the blinding speed of bebop.

Because of this style, Jamal was "often dismissed by jazz writers as no more than a cocktail pianist, a player so given to fluff that his work shouldn't be considered seriously in any artistic sense". Stanley Crouch, author of Considering Genius, offers a very different reaction to Jamal's music, claiming that, like the highly influential Thelonious Monk, Jamal was a true innovator of the jazz tradition and is second in importance in the development of jazz after 1945 only to Parker. His unique musical style stemmed from many individual characteristics, including his use of orchestral effects and his ability to control the beat of songs. These stylistic choices resulted in a unique and new sound for the piano trio: "Through the use of space and changes of rhythm and tempo", writes Crouch, "Jamal invented a group sound that had all the surprise and dynamic variation of an imaginatively ordered big band." Jamal explored the texture of riffs, timbres, and phrases rather than the quantity or speed of notes in any given improvisation. Speaking about Jamal, A. B. Spellman of the National Endowment of the Arts said: "Nobody except Thelonious Monk used space better, and nobody ever applied the artistic device of tension and release better." These (at the time) unconventional techniques that Jamal gleaned from both traditional classical and contemporary jazz musicians helped pave the way for later jazz greats like Bill Evans, Herbie Hancock, and McCoy Tyner.

Though Jamal is often overlooked by jazz critics and historians, he is frequently credited with having a great influence on Miles Davis. Davis is quoted as saying that he was impressed by Jamal's rhythmic sense and his "concept of space, his lightness of touch, his understatement". Jamal characterizes what he thought Davis admired about his music as: "my discipline as opposed to my space."

I don't care what the critics say..... This man can tinkle!

 

Flight
 
Ahmad Jamal
 
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Band of Joy

Band of Joy is English rock singer Robert Plant's ninth solo album and the first with his new band, the Band of Joy. It was released on 13 September 2010 in the UK and 14 September in the USA.

In addition to the song "Satan, Your Kingdom Must Come Down", which is the opening theme for the now-concluded Starz television series Boss, the credits of BBC 1's Luther for an episode aired on 16 July 2013 and the season two finale of the Syfy series Defiance, the album is particularly notable for the song "Monkey", originally of the band Low, which is slowed-down to a grinding, spooky Gothic Rock tempo and mood that is vastly different from Low's version. It is arguably the least similar to other tracks on the album (except for Satan), which for the most part carry folk rock or progressive rock moods. This version of "Monkey" also may be the first Gothic Rock track Robert Plant has ever recorded, and although it is not a staple at Plant's live performances, there have been instances where he has performed it.

The album debuted at #5 on the Billboard 200 chart and at #3 on the UK Albums Chart. The first single released from the album was "Angel Dance".

 

Angel Dance
 
Band of Joy
 
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Big Little Lions

Big Little Lions is the ferocious songwriting duo of Helen Austin and Paul Otten. Both successful singer/songwriters in their own right, they met while both on a conference songwriting member success panel and then a couple of years later started the band from afar, with Helen based on Vancouver Island, BC, Canada and Paul in Cincinnati, OH.

It was while Paul was producing for Helen's JUNO Award winning album that they became Big Little Lions and together they have won many awards including 1st place in the International Songwriting Competition, the top prize of Song of the Year in the John Lennon Songwriting Competition and they won a Canadian Folk Music Award for Ensemble of the Year.

 

 
Quiet One
 
Big Little Lions
 
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Devonté Hynes

Freetown Sound is the third album from Devonté Hynes aka Blood Orange. Written and produced by Hynes, Freetown Sound is a tour de force, a pastiche of Hynes’ past, present, and future that melds his influences with his own established musical voice. 

For well over a decade, Devonté Hynes has proven himself a virtuoso of versatility, experimenting with almost every conceivable musical genre under a variety of monikers. After moving to New York City in the mid-2000s, Hynes became Blood Orange, plumming the oeuvres of the city’s musical legends to create a singular style of urgent, delicate pop music.  Freetown Sound, which follows 2011’s Coastal Grooves and 2013’s breakthrough Cupid Deluxe, builds upon everything Hynes has done as an artist, resulting in the most expansive artistic statement of his career.  Drawing from a deep well of techniques and references, the album unspools like a piece of theater, evoking unexpected communions of moods, voices, and eras.  Freetown Sound derives its name from the birthplace of Hynes’ father, the capital of Sierra Leone. Thematically, it is profoundly personal and unapologetically political, touching on issues of race, religion, sex, and sexism over 17 shimmering songs.

 

Freetown Sound
 
Freetown Sound
 
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